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복합 달 쑈 4중주, 오늘 자정
01/31/2018 14:29
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IP 108.xx.xx.6


미국에서는 152년 만에 볼 수 있는 달 쇼 4붕주를 오늘 밤 관찰 할 수 있을 것이라고 나사가 발표하고 있다.

4중주라 함은 수퍼문, 불루문 , 불러드분과 개기월식이 동시에 일어나기 때문이다.


 Blue Moon, 음력과 양력의 시차로 인해 한 달에 두 번 뜨는 달.

Super Moon, 달과 지구의 거리가 가장 가까워져 크게 보이는 달.

Blood Moon,또는 Red Moon, 지구에 가리워서 태양 광이 붉게 달에 반사되어 보이는 달.

그리고 개기 월식.


이런 4가지 현상을 대략 밤 11시부터 6시 사이에 동시에 관찰할 수 있을 것이라고 한다.

우주 개발의 꿈이 눈앞으로 다가오고 있는 오늘날 달의 신비는 이미 벗겨지고 있다고 하겠지만 이런 종합 달 쇼는 생애 한 번 

볼까 말까 한 행운이 될것 같아 보 아둘만 하기는 할것 같다.



(매일 온라인에서)





A rare super blue blood moon that has not been seen by much of the world for more than 150 years has been gracing the world's skies. 

A 'super blue blood moon' is the result of a blue moon ? the second full moon in a calendar month ? occurring at the same time as a super moon, when the moon is at perigee and about 14 per cent brighter than usual.

It also combines with a blood moon ? the moment during a lunar eclipse when the moon, which is in the Earth's shadow, takes on a reddish hue. 

While people in the eastern Hemisphere saw their last Blue Moon total lunar eclipse in 1982, for the Western Hemisphere, the eclipse was the first blue moon total eclipse since 1866. 

Scroll down for video   

A rare super blue moon is currently rising in the sky over the UK. A super blue moon is the result of a blue moon ? the second full moon in a calendar month ? occurring at the same time as a super moon, when the moon is at perigee and about 14 per cent brighter than usual. Pictured is the moon behind the Walkie Talkie building in London

A rare super blue moon is currently rising in the sky over the UK. A super blue moon is the result of a blue moon ? the second full moon in a calendar month ? occurring at the same time as a super moon, when the moon is at perigee and about 14 per cent brighter than usual. Pictured is the moon behind the Walkie Talkie building in London

As well as a supermoon, the spectacle is a blue moon, defined as the second full moon in a calendar month. UK astronomy enthusiasts looking to see the blue moon at its top-most point will have to brave the cold and windy weather. Pictured is a plane flying in front of the moon in London

As well as a supermoon, the spectacle is a blue moon, defined as the second full moon in a calendar month. UK astronomy enthusiasts looking to see the blue moon at its top-most point will have to brave the cold and windy weather. Pictured is a plane flying in front of the moon in London

Dr Gregory Brown, an astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich, said after the moon has risen at around 5pm GMT today it would remain in the sky until 8am GMT tomorrow morning. Other parts of the world have experienced a 'super blue blood moon', in which the super blue moon combines with a blood moon. Pictured is the moon above London

Dr Gregory Brown, an astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich, said after the moon has risen at around 5pm GMT today it would remain in the sky until 8am GMT tomorrow morning. Other parts of the world have experienced a 'super blue blood moon', in which the super blue moon combines with a blood moon. Pictured is the moon above London

Those in the UK expecting to see a lunar eclipse will be disappointed, as Dr Brown has said it will 'definitely not be visible from the UK, not even a partial eclipse'. Pictured is the moon above London, with St Paul's Cathedral in the foreground

Those in the UK expecting to see a lunar eclipse will be disappointed, as Dr Brown has said it will 'definitely not be visible from the UK, not even a partial eclipse'. Pictured is the moon above London, with St Paul's Cathedral in the foreground

Dr Daniel Brown, an astronomy expert from Nottingham Trent University, told MailOnline that when the moon is quite low in the horizon - for instance when it is rising or sinking past the horizon - the atmosphere of the earth will redden it (pictured) independent of an eclipse. Pictured is the moon rising above flats in north London

Dr Daniel Brown, an astronomy expert from Nottingham Trent University, told MailOnline that when the moon is quite low in the horizon - for instance when it is rising or sinking past the horizon - the atmosphere of the earth will redden it (pictured) independent of an eclipse. Pictured is the moon rising above flats in north London

A 'super blue blood moon' is the result of a blue moon ? the second full moon in a calendar month ? occurring at the same time as a super moon, when the moon is at perigee and about 14 per cent brighter than usual

A 'super blue blood moon' is the result of a blue moon ? the second full moon in a calendar month ? occurring at the same time as a super moon, when the moon is at perigee and about 14 per cent brighter than usual

'It's an astronomical trifecta,' said Kelly Beatty, a senior editor at Sky and Telescope magazine.

'That red light you see is sunlight that has skimmed and bent through Earth's atmosphere and continued on through space to the moon,' said Alan MacRobert of Sky and Telescope magazine.

'In other words, it's from all the sunrises and sunsets that ring the world at the moment.'

While much of the world has experienced a 'super blue blood moon' today, the moon above the UK this evening is just a super blue moon.

This occurs when a blue moon occurs at the same time as a super moon, but without also combining with a blood moon. 

The moon sets behind the Statue of Liberty in New York. . This is the last one in a series of three consecutive 'Supermoons', dubbed the 'Supermoon Trilogy'

The moon sets behind the Statue of Liberty in New York. . This is the last one in a series of three consecutive 'Supermoons', dubbed the 'Supermoon Trilogy'

 The previous 'Supermoons' appeared on 03 December 2017 and on 01 January 2018. A 'Supermoon' commonly is described as a full moon at its closest distance to the earth with the moon appearing larger and brighter than usual. Myanmar, pictured

 The previous 'Supermoons' appeared on 03 December 2017 and on 01 January 2018. A 'Supermoon' commonly is described as a full moon at its closest distance to the earth with the moon appearing larger and brighter than usual. Myanmar, pictured

A "super blood blue moon" is seen during an eclipse behind an elephant statue at a temple in Bangkok, Thailand,

A 'super blood blue moon' is seen during an eclipse behind an elephant statue at a temple in Bangkok, Thailand,

A rare super blue blood moon that has not been seen by much of the world for more than 150 years is gracing the world's skies. The celestial event is the result of three lunar phenomena happening at once. It is pictured here in Lancelin, Australia

A rare super blue blood moon that has not been seen by much of the world for more than 150 years is gracing the world's skies. The celestial event is the result of three lunar phenomena happening at once. It is pictured here in Lancelin, Australia

 The moon rises over a pagoda in Kumal, some 105 kms away from Mandalay City

 The moon rises over a pagoda in Kumal, some 105 kms away from Mandalay City

UK experts suggest the moon, having risen above Britain at 5:00pm GMT, will remain in the skies until 8:00am GMT tomorrow.

Despite the UK not experiencing a lunar eclipse, and therefore missing out on a blood moon, many pictures seem to show the satellite glowing red.

Dr Daniel Brown, an astronomer at Nottingham Trent University, told MailOnline this is because when the moon is quite low in the horizon - for instance when it is rising or sinking past the horizon - the atmosphere of the earth will redden it independent of an eclipse.

A lunar eclipse occurs when the sun is on the other side of the Earth while the moon is located on Earth's opposite side.

The super blue blood moon is pictured behind the Statue of Liberty in New York. The event began at 10:51am UTC or 05:51 ET with the full lunar eclipse starting at 12:51 am UTC or 07:51 ET and reaching its maximum at 1.29pm UTC or 08:29am ET

The super blue blood moon is pictured behind the Statue of Liberty in New York. The event began at 10:51am UTC (10:51 GMT, 05:51 ET) with the full lunar eclipse starting at 12:51 am UTC (12:51 GMT, 07:51 ET) and reaching its maximum at 1.29pm UTC (1.29pm GMT, 08:29am ET)

The partial eclipse is seen  just above the horizon in Washington DC. The darker part of Earth's shadow began to blanket part of the moon with a reddish tint at 6:48 am EST (11:48 GMT)

The partial eclipse is seen just above the horizon in Washington DC. The darker part of Earth's shadow began to blanket part of the moon with a reddish tint at 6:48 am EST (11:48 GMT)

The moon is pictured behind the Staten Island Ferry, seen from Brooklyn

The moon is pictured behind the Staten Island Ferry, seen from Brooklyn

People watch the super blue blood moon over Brooklyn. While people in the eastern Hemisphere saw their last Blue Moon total lunar eclipse in 1982, for the Western Hemisphere, this eclipse will be the first blue moon total eclipse since 1866

People watch the super blue blood moon over Brooklyn. While people in the eastern Hemisphere saw their last Blue Moon total lunar eclipse in 1982, for the Western Hemisphere, this eclipse will be the first blue moon total eclipse since 1866

'Most of the time the full moon sits above or below Earth's shadow and the moon remains flooded with sunlight', explains Dr Tanya Hill, an Honorary Fellow of the University of Melbourne, writing for The Conversation.

'But twice a year, the three bodies fall into line so that Earth casts its shadow on the moon.'

The Earth's shadow is not completely black but has a reddishy hue, which has led many cultures to describe it as a blood moon.

Sunlight manages to reach the moon but first it has to pass through Earth's atmosphere.

This makes the sky redder (as it scatters away shorter shorter wavelengths of light) and also bends the path of the light, directing it into the shadow.

Unlike a solar eclipse, this lunar eclipse can be safely viewed without protective eyewear.

A so-called 'Supermoon' rises above the Olympic rings installation at the Alpensia Ski Jumping Center of the PyeongChang Winter Olympic Games 2018

A so-called 'Supermoon' rises above the Olympic rings installation at the Alpensia Ski Jumping Center of the PyeongChang Winter Olympic Games 2018

People take photos of the super moon  in Lancelin, Australia

People take photos of the super moon in Lancelin, Australia

A super blue blood moon rises over the city of Perth in Western Australia. Enthusiasts have been waiting 150 years to see the triple lunar event

A super blue blood moon rises over the city of Perth in Western Australia. Enthusiasts have been waiting 150 years to see the triple lunar event

 The 'super blue blood moon' is seen over Los Angeles, California, on January 31, 2018

 The 'super blue blood moon' is seen over Los Angeles, California, on January 31, 2018

The moon rises between two office buildings in Bangkok

The moon rises between two office buildings in Bangkok

'We've had a lot of super moons and we've had lunar eclipses, but it's rare that it also happens to be a blue moon,' said Jason Aufdenberg, associate professor of physics and astronomy at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University's campus in Daytona Beach, Florida.

'All three of these cycles lining up is what makes this unusual,' he added.

'It's just a wonder to behold.' 

The first super moon of this year appeared on 1 January.

Lunar eclipses during a super moon happen rather regularly and the last one was in September 2015.

Lunar eclipses occur at least twice a year while super moons can happen four to six times a year.

A rare super blue blood moon - which might look similar to this large orange moon spotted rising over Griffith Park in Los Angeles - is gracing the world's skies. When the moon is nearer the horizon, moonlight must pass through more atmosphere than when it is overhead, which is why the moon sometimes appear orange

A rare super blue blood moon - which might look similar to this large orange moon spotted rising over Griffith Park in Los Angeles - is gracing the world's skies. When the moon is nearer the horizon, moonlight must pass through more atmosphere than when it is overhead, which is why the moon sometimes appear orange

Crowds gather on the Marine Parade Beach to watch the moon rise in Napier, New Zealand just hours before the start of the rare lunar spectacle. A Super Blue Blood Moon is the result of three lunar phenomena happening all at once

Crowds gather on the Marine Parade Beach to watch the moon rise in Napier, New Zealand just hours before the start of the rare lunar spectacle. A Super Blue Blood Moon is the result of three lunar phenomena happening all at once

The last time the spectacle was seen was in 1866, 152 years ago. Pictured is the full moon above the Marine Parade Beach in New Zealand

The last time the spectacle was seen was in 1866, 152 years ago. Pictured is the full moon above the Marine Parade Beach in New Zealand

Dr Daniel Brown an astronomy expert from Nottingham Trent University told MailOnline that when the moon is quite low in the horizon the atmosphere of the earth will redden it independent of eclipse. Pictured in New Zealand

Dr Daniel Brown an astronomy expert from Nottingham Trent University told MailOnline that when the moon is quite low in the horizon the atmosphere of the earth will redden it independent of eclipse. Pictured in New Zealand

The moon is seen during a lunar eclipse, referred to as the "super blue blood moon", in Beijing 

The moon is seen during a lunar eclipse, referred to as the 'super blue blood moon', in Beijing 

Pictured the large orange moon rises above the old city of Jerusalem this morning

Pictured the large orange moon rises above the old city of Jerusalem this morning

The red moon rises over hills near the city of Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk on Sakhalin Island in Russia's Far East ahead of the appearance of the rare super blue blood moon. The UK, Europe and Africa will miss out on seeing the red tinge on the super moon as they'll be unable to see the lunar eclipse

The red moon rises over hills near the city of Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk on Sakhalin Island in Russia's Far East ahead of the appearance of the rare super blue blood moon. The UK, Europe and Africa will miss out on seeing the red tinge on the super moon as they'll be unable to see the lunar eclipse

The moon will be much bigger and brighter than usual it will also be second full moon of the month, making it a blue moon. It might look similar to the orange-coloured super moon rising over the tower of the Lakhta Cente in St Petersburg this morning

The moon will be much bigger and brighter than usual it will also be second full moon of the month, making it a blue moon. It might look similar to the orange-coloured super moon rising over the tower of the Lakhta Cente in St Petersburg this morning

A 'super blue blood moon' is the result of a blue moon ? the second full moon in a calendar month ? occurring at the same time as a super moon, when the moon is at perigee and about 14 per cent brighter than usual. Pictured is the large, super moon rising over the hills near the city of Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk on Sakhalin Island in Russia this morning

A 'super blue blood moon' is the result of a blue moon ? the second full moon in a calendar month ? occurring at the same time as a super moon, when the moon is at perigee and about 14 per cent brighter than usual. Pictured is the large, super moon rising over the hills near the city of Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk on Sakhalin Island in Russia this morning

The incredible celestial event turns the moon a reddish hue as the lunar eclipse happens. Pictured is the super moon rising behind the Saffron Square building in Croydon ahead of this 'unusual' event

The incredible celestial event turns the moon a reddish hue as the lunar eclipse happens. Pictured is the super moon rising behind the Saffron Square building in Croydon ahead of this 'unusual' event

The next super moon lunar eclipse visible throughout all of the United States will be January 21, 2019 - though that one will not be a blue moon.

A full moon occurs every 29.5 days, but our months are longer (excluding February).

This mismatch of timing means that every couple of years there comes a month with two full moons. 

According to experts from Nasa, the event will also offer experts a chance to see what happens to the moon when it cools quickly.

This information will help them understand characteristics of the regolith ? the mixture of soil and loose rocks on the surface ? and how it changes over time.

A rare occurrence called a 'Super Blue Blood Moon' is seen behind the U.S. flag at Santa Monica Beach in Los Angeles

A rare occurrence called a 'Super Blue Blood Moon' is seen behind the U.S. flag at Santa Monica Beach in Los Angeles

A Super Blue Blood Moon hovers over Los Angeles, California in the early hours of January 31, 2018, during an event not seen since 1866 when three fairly common lunar happenings occur at the same time

A Super Blue Blood Moon hovers over Los Angeles, California in the early hours of January 31, 2018, during an event not seen since 1866 when three fairly common lunar happenings occur at the same time

The moon is pictured behind the East Point Lighthouse in Cumberland County New Jersey

The moon is pictured behind the East Point Lighthouse in Cumberland County New Jersey

The moon rises near Bondi beach in Sydney hours before the full lunar eclipse

The moon rises near Bondi beach in Sydney hours before the full lunar eclipse

The partial eclipse began at around 11.48am GMT, before reaching its peak at 1.29pm GMT. According to Sky and Telescope, the last blue moon total lunar eclipse visible from North America happened on March 31, 1866. A man takes pictures as the moon rises near Bondi beach

The partial eclipse began at around 11.48am GMT, before reaching its peak at 1.29pm GMT. According to Sky and Telescope, the last blue moon total lunar eclipse visible from North America happened on March 31, 1866. A man takes pictures as the moon rises near Bondi beach

Pictured is the moon rising near Bondi beach hours before the celestial event

Pictured is the moon rising near Bondi beach hours before the celestial event

The Earth's shadow is not completely black but has a reddishy hue, which has led many cultures to describe it as a blood moon. Pictured is the moon above Marine Parade Beach  in Napier, New Zealand

The Earth's shadow is not completely black but has a reddishy hue, which has led many cultures to describe it as a blood moon. Pictured is the moon above Marine Parade Beach in Napier, New Zealand

'The whole character of the moon changes when we observe with a thermal camera during an eclipse,' said Paul Hayne of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado Boulder.

'In the dark, many familiar craters and other features can't be seen, and the normally nondescript areas around some craters start to 'glow' because the rocks there are still warm.'

Normally, the transitions into and out of darkness and the temperature changes that go with them, are spread over the course of a lunar day (29-and-a-half days).

'During a lunar eclipse, the temperature swing is so dramatic that it's as if the surface of the moon goes from being in an oven to being in a freezer in just a few hours,' said Noah Petro, deputy project scientist for NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

From the Haleakala Observatory on the island of Maui in Hawaii, the team will conduct their investigations at invisible wavelengths where heat is sensed.

They've done this kind of study a few times already, singling out individual lunar locations to see how well they retain warmth throughout the eclipse.

Crowds look on as the super moon rises behind the Fremantle War Memorial at Monument Hill in Australia on November 14, 2016

Crowds look on as the super moon rises behind the Fremantle War Memorial at Monument Hill in Australia on November 14, 2016

Pictured is a super moon rising over lake george near Canberra

Pictured is a super moon rising over lake george near Canberra

Skywatchers gather at Beijing Planetarium to watch a "super blood blue moon" eclipse with telescopes

Skywatchers gather at Beijing Planetarium to watch a "super blood blue moon" eclipse with telescopes

People watch the the Super moon rising in the sand dunes on January 31, 2018 in Lancelin, Australia. Last seen from Australia in December 1983, a Super Blue Blood Moon is the result of three lunar phenomena happening all at once

People watch the the Super moon rising in the sand dunes on January 31, 2018 in Lancelin, Australia. Last seen from Australia in December 1983, a Super Blue Blood Moon is the result of three lunar phenomena happening all at once

WHAT IS THE SUPER BLUE BLOOD MOON AND WHEN CAN YOU SEE IT?

What is the super blue blood moon?

A rare celestial event that hasn't been seen by much of the world in more than 150 years is set to grace the skies on Wednesday.

A 'super blood blue moon' will be visible on 31 January, with western North America, Asia, the Middle East, Russia and Australia getting the best view of the stunning phenomena.  

The event is causing a buzz because it combines three unusual lunar events - an extra big super moon, a blue moon and a total lunar eclipse.

It's the third in a series of 'super moons,' when the moon is closer to Earth in its orbit - known as perigee - and about 14 percent brighter and 30 per cent larger than usual.

It's also the second full moon of the month, commonly known as a 'blue moon', which happens every two years and eight months.

The super blue moon will pass through Earth's shadow to give viewers in the right location a total lunar eclipse.

While the moon is in the Earth's shadow it will take on a reddish tint, known as a 'blood moon.'

Sunlight manages to reach the moon but first it has to pass through Earth's atmosphere.

This makes the sky redder (as it scatters away shorter shorter wavelengths of light) and also bends the path of the light, directing it into the shadow.

When and how can you see it?

Everything begins at 10:51am UTC (10:51 GMT, 05:51 ET) with the full lunar eclipse happening at 12:51 am UTC (12:51 GMT, 07:51 ET) and reaching its maximum at 1.29pm UTC (1.29pm GMT, 08:29am ET).

The full eclipse will happen at 2:07pm UTC (2:07pm GMT, 9:07am ET) although some of it will still be visible after that.

The UK, Europe and Africa will also miss out on seeing the red tinge on the super moon as they'll be unable to see the lunar eclipse. 

Weather permitting, eclipse fans in Hawaii will experience the lunar eclipse from start to finish, as will skywatchers in Alaska, Australia and eastern Asia. 

Experts say the best viewing in the US will be from the west. Californians and viewers in western Canada will be treated to the total eclipse phase from start to finish, though the penumbral shadow will pass after the moon has set.

Due to the time zone it will be harder to see it from the east coast. For people viewing the event from New York or Washington, the moon will enter the outer part of Earth's shadow at 5:51 am (10:51 GMT) but will hardly be noticeable.

The darker part of Earth's shadow will begin to blanket part of the moon with a reddish tint at 6:48 am EST (11:48 GMT), but the moon will set less than a half-hour later. 

If you live in the Central time zone, viewing will be better, since the action begins when the moon is higher in the western sky. 

In the Rocky Mountain region, the show begins as the umbra touches the edge of the moon at 4:48 a.m. MST (11:48 GMT, 06:48 EST).

Unlike a solar eclipse, this lunar eclipse can be safely viewed without protective eyewear.

For anyone unable to watch the event , it will be streamed online.  

The super blue moon will pass through Earth's shadow to give viewers in the right location a total lunar eclipse. While the Moon is in the Earth's shadow it will take on a reddish tint, known as a 'blood moon'

The super blue moon will pass through Earth's shadow to give viewers in the right location a total lunar eclipse. While the Moon is in the Earth's shadow it will take on a reddish tint, known as a 'blood moon'

How rare is it?

While people in the eastern Hemisphere saw their last Blue Moon total lunar eclipse in 1982, for the Western Hemisphere, this eclipse will be the first blue moon total eclipse since 1866. 

According to Sky and Telescope magazine, 'the last time a complete lunar cover-up took place on the second full moon of the month was December 30, 1982, at least as reckoned by local time in Europe, Africa, and western Asia - locations where the event could be seen.'

That event also occurred at the moon's orbital perigee, making it an extra bright super moon.

According to Sky and Telescope, the last blue moon total lunar eclipse visible from North America happened on March 31, 1866.

'But on that date the moon was near apogee, its most distant point from Earth,' it said. 

Why is it important for science?

According to experts from Nasa, the event will also offer experts a chance to see what happens to the moon when it cools quickly.

This information will help them understand characteristics of the regolith ? the mixture of soil and loose rocks on the surface ? and how it changes over time.

'The whole character of the moon changes when we observe with a thermal camera during an eclipse,' said Paul Hayne of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado Boulder.

'In the dark, many familiar craters and other features can't be seen, and the normally nondescript areas around some craters start to 'glow' because the rocks there are still warm.'

Normally, the transitions into and out of darkness and the temperature changes that go with them, are spread over the course of a lunar day (29-and-a-half days).

'During a lunar eclipse, the temperature swing is so dramatic that it's as if the surface of the moon goes from being in an oven to being in a freezer in just a few hours,' said Noah Petro, deputy project scientist for NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

From the Haleakala Observatory on the island of Maui in Hawaii, the team will conduct their investigations at invisible wavelengths where heat is sensed.

They've done this kind of study a few times already, singling out individual lunar locations to see how well they retain warmth throughout the eclipse.

How quickly or slowly the surface loses heat depends on the sizes of the rocks and the characteristics of the material, including its composition, how porous it is and how fluffy it is.

By comparing the two types of observations, the team is able to look at variations in particular areas ? say, the lunar swirls at Reiner Gamma or an impact crater and the loose debris around it.

This kind of information is useful for practical purposes such as scouting out suitable landing sites. It also helps researchers understand the evolution of the surface of the moon.

'These studies will help us tell the story of how impacts large and small are changing the surface of the moon over geological time,' said Dr Petro.

Experts believe the last time a super moon, blue moon and total lunar eclipse were all visible at the same time was from the eastern United States was on 31 May, 1844

Experts believe the last time a super moon, blue moon and total lunar eclipse were all visible at the same time was from the eastern United States was on 31 May, 1844

How quickly or slowly the surface loses heat depends on the sizes of the rocks and the characteristics of the material, including its composition, how porous it is and how fluffy it is.

By comparing the two types of observations, the team is able to look at variations in particular areas ? say, the lunar swirls at Reiner Gamma or an impact crater and the loose debris around it.

This kind of information is useful for practical purposes such as scouting out suitable landing sites. It also helps researchers understand the evolution of the surface of the moon.

'These studies will help us tell the story of how impacts large and small are changing the surface of the moon over geological time,' said Dr Petro.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5334261/Rare-super-blue-blood-moon-arrive.html#ixzz55n8sAlxt 
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복합 달 쑈 4중주, 오늘 자정